Show emotion and you are too fragile, untrustworthy, and incapable for the serious adult work of politics. You are manipulative, and all the other things people like to say about women when they express feelings; you can’t approach situations objectively, you can’t be trusted to make the right decisions in times of stress, you clearly aren’t capable of setting aside your feelings on complex emotional issues. Don’t show your emotions and you’re inhuman, suspect because you don’t behave in a feminine way, which means you might be too cold and unfeeling for politics, unable to bring compassion to your job.

rtnt:

Read This, Not That: Police Power and the Occupy Movement
Instances of police brutality are often cited as giving momentum to the Occupy Wall Street movement, garnering attention to events that otherwise would have unfolded without note. But the increasingly violent response to mass protest in the United States over the last few decades has likely done as much to quash the nascent movement as spread it. Alasdair Roberts, for the Boston Review:

The Occupy Wall Street protest that began in mid-September has inspired similar demonstrations throughout the country, and the movement as a whole may have helped to sharpen public opinion about the financial crisis and its consequences. But it has also shown how hostile American politics has become to the very idea of mass, angry protest. After decades of increasingly sophisticated policing and changing notions about the boundaries of legitimate protest, public demonstration in the United States today is not only tamer than in Europe, but perhaps also tamer than at any time in the nation’s history.

Read the full article here.

rtnt:

Read This, Not That: Police Power and the Occupy Movement

Instances of police brutality are often cited as giving momentum to the Occupy Wall Street movement, garnering attention to events that otherwise would have unfolded without note. But the increasingly violent response to mass protest in the United States over the last few decades has likely done as much to quash the nascent movement as spread it. Alasdair Roberts, for the Boston Review:

The Occupy Wall Street protest that began in mid-September has inspired similar demonstrations throughout the country, and the movement as a whole may have helped to sharpen public opinion about the financial crisis and its consequences. But it has also shown how hostile American politics has become to the very idea of mass, angry protest. After decades of increasingly sophisticated policing and changing notions about the boundaries of legitimate protest, public demonstration in the United States today is not only tamer than in Europe, but perhaps also tamer than at any time in the nation’s history.

Read the full article here.


(via absea)



Enough

Draw a line across your own self destruction.
Return to the land of the living.




chasewhiteside:

rtnt:
Read This, Not That: Police Power and the Occupy Movement
Instances of police brutality are often cited as giving momentum to the Occupy Wall Street movement, garnering attention to events that otherwise would have unfolded without note. But the increasingly violent response to mass protest in the United States over the last few decades has likely done as much to quash the nascent movement as spread it. Alasdair Roberts, for the Boston Review:

The Occupy Wall Street protest that began in mid-September has inspired similar demonstrations throughout the country, and the movement as a whole may have helped to sharpen public opinion about the financial crisis and its consequences. But it has also shown how hostile American politics has become to the very idea of mass, angry protest. After decades of increasingly sophisticated policing and changing notions about the boundaries of legitimate protest, public demonstration in the United States today is not only tamer than in Europe, but perhaps also tamer than at any time in the nation’s history.

Read the full article here.

chasewhiteside:

rtnt:

Read This, Not That: Police Power and the Occupy Movement

Instances of police brutality are often cited as giving momentum to the Occupy Wall Street movement, garnering attention to events that otherwise would have unfolded without note. But the increasingly violent response to mass protest in the United States over the last few decades has likely done as much to quash the nascent movement as spread it. Alasdair Roberts, for the Boston Review:

The Occupy Wall Street protest that began in mid-September has inspired similar demonstrations throughout the country, and the movement as a whole may have helped to sharpen public opinion about the financial crisis and its consequences. But it has also shown how hostile American politics has become to the very idea of mass, angry protest. After decades of increasingly sophisticated policing and changing notions about the boundaries of legitimate protest, public demonstration in the United States today is not only tamer than in Europe, but perhaps also tamer than at any time in the nation’s history.

Read the full article here.



beautyisinliving:

I miss this place…. i miss these people.

We miss you too, Alie Pants :) 

beautyisinliving:

I miss this place…. i miss these people.

We miss you too, Alie Pants :) 

(via beautyisinliving-deactivated201)



stencils:

l.e.t - i´m so angry i made a sign (by l.e.t.)

stencils:

l.e.t - i´m so angry i made a sign (by l.e.t.)


stencils:

vexta east brunswick (by the euskadi 11)

stencils:

vexta east brunswick (by the euskadi 11)